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patience

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Something I used to frequently say regarding childbirth was that I was born in the last days because Heavenly Father knew I couldn’t handle a natural childbirth and knew I needed epidurals. It was something I would always joke about, but also really believed. I might be mentally strong, spiritually strong, but physically strong? No way. That was not for me. I wasn’t a hardy pioneer woman that pushed handcarts and gave birth along the Mormon trail. Heavenly Father knew me and knew my mental and physical limitations. Or so I thought.

Today’s Virtual Book Tour post comes from the lovely C Jane (and her sister Lucy). Here’s an excerpt: Five years ago I wrote an essay called “The Hour Glass Theory” for Segullah. It’s a piece about miscarriage, death, time and birth–the heavy things we feel…

When I start feeling sorry for myself or overwhelmed by all the day-to-day problems and concerns in my life as a wife and mother, it often helps me to think about my great-grandmother, Cassie. Cassie was born in 1890 in a two-room log cabin in Mapleton, UT, “one mile west of one of the most beautiful mts. in the world,” as she described it. Cassie wrote, “Well you know that the years from 1907 to 1918 were the happiest and grandest years of this mortal life to me.” 1907 was the year she met and married her sweetheart, Edmund, and the autumn of 1918 was the start of several years I can’t even fathom enduring.

If you find yourself weighed-down by dark clouds of despair, take heart. The sun will come out again. It will. And you may even be grateful for the clouds that made the sunshine all the more welcomed and cherished. Hang on, my friend.

For today’s “guest post,” I’ve asked three of our book’s fans who have not yet crossed the bridge into motherhood to join me for an interview. Childbirth wasn’t something I became interested in until I became pregnant myself. So it intrigued and excited me that we had women reading our book who were not yet married or mothers. I wanted to dig into their heads and see if I could figure out how to get more of their peers to begin educating themselves about their sacred life-giving abilities (before marriage and pregnancy). I’ve loved “talking” with these women… Shaylee Ann, Emily, and Lynette. I hope you love them too.

As I continue to wait upon the Lord and our daughter, I hope to be able to be more patient with my new understanding. I have done what I need to do. I know that I need to continue to keep myself healthy by eating right and getting good rest. I can choose to be hopeful instead of waitful by taking advantage of this “extra” time to prepare for our baby’s arrival. I can visualize her learning at the feet of my Grandmother or other loved ones gaining that last minute instruction that will help her have the strength and wisdom she will need on this earth.

As I look back over my nearly-32 years on this earth, I can see that my whole life was a series of wombs and birth canals. Comfortable lulls followed by strait and narrow (frequently uncomfortable) squeezes into my next phase of growth and development.